New Zealand Trip

 Monterey cypress north of Auckland, New Zealand

Monterey cypress north of Auckland, New Zealand

Just got back from a 2 week trip to New Zealand - it's been my #1 "bucket list" place for a long time.   I was especially excited to see trees that are San Francisco street trees (New Zealand Christmas trees, giant dracaena, tea trees, etc.) in their native habitat.  

One thing I noticed was LOTS of Monterey cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa) and Monterey pine (Pinus radiata, which the New Zealanders call "Radiata pine") in the countryside, used as windbreaks, shade for sheep and other livestock, accent trees, etc.  Which made big parts of the countryside look a lot like California!  There were also many stands of Monterey pine used used as lumber trees - without any evidence of pine canker that i could see.  

Northern hemisphere conifers (Douglas fir is a prominent example) have become naturalized in big parts of New Zealand, and have become invasive pests, taking over entire landscapes.  Interestingly, our Monterey pine and Monterey cypress are not invasive, because the cones of the tree typically only open and disburse their seeds where there is fire or extremely hot weather.   

 New Zealand Christmas tree in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand

New Zealand Christmas tree in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand

I spent three days hiking through native beech forest on the Routeburn Track on the South Island.  It was very cool to see forests composed almost entirely of  different species of Nothofagus (a cousin of our northern hemisphere beeches) because they were so new to me (the only Nothofagus I can remember seeing here in CA was a giant specimen at Filoli, south of San Francisco).  One cool tree I encountered along the way:  the tree fuchsia - Fuchsia excorticata, the world's largest fuchsia, with distinctive papery bark (and recognizable fuchsia flowers).   

Of course, I made a point to find New Zealand Christmas trees (Metrosideros excelsa) on the North Island, although sadly by the time we got there on January 2, they were almost all out of bloom (these native trees seemed to be strict about blooming at Christmas time).   They're called by the Mauri name "Pohutukawa" in New Zealand, and the New Zealanders were very surprised to find that they were popular street trees in San Francisco.  

 Aerial roots on a New Zealand Christmas tree in Gisbourne, North Island, New Zealand

Aerial roots on a New Zealand Christmas tree in Gisbourne, North Island, New Zealand

Sadly we didn’t get to see any Nikau palms (New Zealand's only native palm, and one of my favorites of the palms) in their glory - saw a few of them planted as street trees (!) in Whangarei in the north island, and every once in a while saw one in the kauri forest on the west side of the north island.  I was surprised to find that the best places to see them in New Zealand were on the west side of the cooler south island.

It was a great trip - New Zealand is a great place to visit for many reasons, and interesting trees is definitely one of them!    

Ceanothus in bloom

Ceanothus seems to be in bloom all over the city as I write (early April 2017).   There are 50 or so speciesof Ceanothus, but very few that can be trained as a tree.  Ceanothus 'Ray Hartman" is one - it's a hybrid (cross) between two parent species: Ceanothus arboreus from Catalina Island in southern California, and the northern California Ceanothus griseusIt’s the only Ceanothus planted as a street tree in San Francisco, and one of the very few California natives that you’ll see planted in sidewalk cuts on the street (along with Catalina ironwood).  

These trees in Cole Valley at the corner of Waller and Cole are some of the best in San Francisco.

(And I wish I knew who this "Ray Hartman" was/is - doesn't seem to be any info on the web about him.   Let me know if you know!

 Corner of Waller Street and Cole Street in San Francisco

Corner of Waller Street and Cole Street in San Francisco

Ceanothus closeup

 

 

Azores Trees

Just got back from a week in the Azores - Sao Miguel and Terceira islands.   The Azores are Portuguese islands in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean - 800 miles west of Portugal, and about 2000 miles east of Boston - volcanic islands, with a mild, San Francisco-like climate (coastal, rarely above 80 degrees fahrenheit, and rarely below 45 degrees).  

 New Zealand Christmas tree - Ponta Delgada in Sao Miguel Island, Azores

New Zealand Christmas tree - Ponta Delgada in Sao Miguel Island, Azores

It was interesting to see so many introduced trees in the Azores that are popular as ornamentals here in San Francisco.   Metrosideros excelsa (New Zealand Christmas tree) is often used as an ornamental, but also naturalized in the forests of hte islands (which I have never seen here in California).   The New Zealand Christmas tree in the photo above was a huge specimen in Ponta Delgada, the capital city of the Azores - so big that it had supports to hold up its limbs - if you look carefully you'll see the many vertical steel supports.    Araucarias are everywhere as specimen trees -- especially Norfolk Island Pine trees.  (The Norfolk Island Pine in the photo below was a young specimen just outside our hotel window in Angra de Heroismo, the largest city on Terceira Island- the hotel was in an early 1600s stone fort built by the Spanish during a 40 year period when they controlled the islands).   And Pittosporum undulatum (Victorian box) is everywhere as a naturalized tree - to the point where there were forests of the tree - it has become an ecological problem on the islands.

 Norfolk Island Pine - Angra de Heroismo on Terceira Island

Norfolk Island Pine - Angra de Heroismo on Terceira Island

There are trees that are native to the Azores - in fact endemic to them (found in nature only there).  It was interesting to see native species that were closely related to trees I recognized, but which had developed into separate species as a result of the physical isolation of the islands.  Laurus azorica, for example, was obviously a close relative of the Grecian bay (Laurus nobilis) that is found on our streets.  

And London planes (Platanus X acerifolia) lining the roads everywhere.   The trees below were in a back road on Terceira island.

LondonPlane.jpg